Index

Duncan was still a hostage in England when his father Gilbert de Galloway died in January 1185. His release however was less straightforward, as his cousin Roland son of Uchtred had moved quickly to re-clain his father’s land by invading Galloway.  Roland’s invasion took place in July of that year, when according to John de Fordun, Roland with the help of King William gathered together an army, and engaged in battle Gillepatrick, Henry Kennedy and a certain Samuel, leaders who had remained loyal to Gilbert and almost certainly his son Duncan. All these men and others perished in the battle along with others from Galloway. Fordun tells us, Henry II king of England was furious with Roland over the deaths of these men, for he had supported them the previous year in matters that aimed to safeguard himself and his own rights in Galloway.


For Duncan, Henry II’s intervention and support was pivotal on his part to re-claiming his patrimony and the following year, in May 1186, we find King William, his brother Earl Henry, and their leading magnates summoned to Henry’s court at Oxford to settle amongst other things the matter of succession to Galloway. Roland’s failure however to submit to Henry’s will and his open definance lead Henry to assemble an army at Carlisle in the summer of 1186 against him. Roland submitted to Henry at Carlisle at King William’s instruction and a settlement was drawn up that allowed him to succeed to the whole of Galloway.  Duncan seems to have reluctantly accepted the agreement, and in return for his acceptance, King William gave him Carrick as compensation for the loss of his father’s great lordship over which Henry had claimed dominance.


[1] Duncan, son of Gilbert son of Fergus


1186: HENRICUS, rex Anglise, graviter exasperatus erga Rotholandum, pro morte proditorum Galwalensium, quos anno praecedenti se suaque jura tuendo belli lege prostraverat, atque, ad suggestionem malivolorum quorundam, eum habens exosum, coadunato contra eum undequaque per Angliam exercitu, Karlele usque progressus est, ubi Rotholandus, jussu et consilio, doniini sui regis Scociae, ad eum veniens, honorifice cum ipso concordatus est. Deinde rex Willelmus eidem, propter suam fidelitatem, et maxima beneficia sibi regnoque sapeius illata, totam terram Galwalliae dedit, terram scilicet Gilberti, cum terra, quam pridem hereditario jure possidebat. Pacem etiam et concordiam inter Rotholandum filiumque Gilberti composuit. Eidem itaque filio Gilberti, terris sui patris renuiicianti, quieteque Rotholando pro perpetuo gaudendam annuenti, rex totain Karryk concessit, cunctis temporibus possessuram.

[Skene, William F.: Johannis de Fordun Chronica Gentis Scotorum (Edinburgh, 1871), p. 269]


[Translation] Henry, king of England, was very bitter against Roland, for the death of the Galloway traitors, whom, in defending himself and his rights, the latter had, the year before, overthrown in battle; and, through the promptings of certain evil-minded persons, feeling a deep hatred towards him, he levied an army against him, from all parts of England, and advanced as far as Carlisle. Roland, however, at the bidding and advice of his lord the king of Scotland, came thither to him, and they arrived at an honourable understanding. King William afterwards, on account of this Roland's faithfulness, and the many times he had so well bestead both him and the kingdom, gave him the whole land of Galloway—that is to say, Gilbert's lands, besides the lands he had himself formerly held by right of inheritance. He also restored peace and harmony between Roland and Gilbert's son. To this son of Gilbert's, likewise, who did forego his father's lands, and quietly agreed that Roland should enjoy them for ever, the king granted the whole of Carrick in possession for all time.

[Skene, William F.: John of Fordoun’s Chronicle of the Scottish Nation (Edinburgh, 1872) p. 265]


[2] Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus


1193: Charter by Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus by which he has given and granted and with this present charter confirmed to God and the church of St Marie of Melrose and the monks there serving God, for the souls of David and Malcolm, my lord kings, and Earl Henry, and for the salvation of my lord, King William and his brother David, and Earl Duncan, and for my own salvation and of my father and my mother, and for the salvation of his ancestors and successors, in free, pure and perpetual alms, the land of “Maybothelbeg” [Maybole]. After defining the extent of the bounds of the lands of Maybole, he also granted the monks and the church of Melrose the whole of the land of “Bethoc” [Beoch] in free, pure and perpetual alms. The monks were nevertheless to give him each year two marks as payment for Beoch. Witnessed by Lord Jocelin, bishop of Glasgow; William, abbot of Holyrood; Simon archideacon [of Glasgow]; Earl Duncan [of Fife]; Malcolm his son; Earl Gilbert [of Strathern]; Eth (Aed) son of the Earl [Alwin] of Lennox; Roger de Skelbrooke; Gilleasald mac Gilleandres; Gillenem mac Colman; Edgar, my chamberlain; Gillecrist Bretnach [the Briton].

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 20. no. 29]


[Comment] The Chronicle of Melrose dates this grant to 1193. Bishop Jocelin died in 1199 and Simon, archdeacon died between 1195 and 1196. Earl Gilbert of Strathern died 1223. Gillechrist the Briton might well be Gillecrist mac makin, see No. 3.  


[3] Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus


1193: Dunecanus filius Gileberti de Galweia dedit Deo et fancte Marie et monachis de Melros quandam partem terre fue in Karic, que dicitur Maybothel, in perpetuam elemofinam, pro falute anime fue et omnium parentum fuorum, coram epifcopo Jocelino et aliis multis teflibus, ficut ejus carta teftatur.

[Chronica de Mailros by the Bannatyne Club (Edinburgh, 1835), p. 100]


[Translation] Duncan, the son of Gilbert of Galwey, gave to God and to St. Mary, and to the monks of Melrose, a certain portion of his lands in Karec, which is called Maybothel, in perpetual alms, for the health of his own soul and of the souls of all his relatives, in the presence of bishop Joscelin and many witnesses, as his charter avouches.

[Stevenson, Joseph: A Medieval Chronicles of Scotland (Felinfach, Lampster, reprint 1991), p. 28]


[4] Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus


1193: 2nd Charter by ‘Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus by which he has given and granted and with this present charter confirmed to God and the church of St Marie of Melrose and the monks there serving God, for the souls of David and Malcolm, my lord kings, and Earl Henry, and for the salvation of my lord, King William and his brother David, and Earl Duncan, and for my own salvation and of my father and my mother, and for the salvation of his ancestors and successors, in free, pure and perpetual alms, the land of “Maibothelbeg” [Maybole], to have and possess in perpetuity freely quietly and to be free from all landl, customary secular services exactions as in any other alms gift freely quietly fully and honourably in the Scots kingdom within the bounds noted in this my present charter’.  After stating the extent of the bounds of the land of Maybole, he also gave and granted all the land of “Bethoc” [Beoch], in free, pure and perpetual alms, but they shall give him each year two marks of silver in payment for Beoch. Witnessed by Lord Jocelin, bishop of Glasgow; William, abbot of Holyrood; Simon archideacon [of Glasgow]; Sir Roland [lord of Galloway]; Malcolm son of the Earl Duncan [of Fife]; Eth (Aed) son of the Earl of Lennox; William, Walter and John, the bishop’s clerk; Roger de Skelbrooke; Gilleasald mac Gilleandres; Gillenem mac Colman; Edgar, my chamberlain.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 22. no. 30]


[Comment] This charter appears to be a re-grant of the original.


[5] Roger de Skelbrooke


1193-1195: Charter by Roger de Skelbrooke by which he has given and granted and with this present charter confirmed to God and the church of St Marie of Melrose and the monks there serving God, for the souls of David and Malcolm, my lord kings, and Earl Henry, for the souls of Gilbert son of Fergus, ‘my lord’, and his wife, and for the soul of my father and my mother and all my relatives, and for the salvation of my lord, King William and Earl David, his brother, and Earl Duncan and Duncan son of Gilbert, his lord, and for the salvation of himself and all of his successors, in free, pure and perpetual alms, all the land of ‘Drumeceisuiene’, ‘Alesburc’ and ‘Auchnephur’, by stated bounds, free from all service of the land, custom and secular exaction. They will give to him and his heir, one silver mark each year for the recognition of the alms of ‘Auchnephur’, namely half a mark at Pentecost and half a mark at the feast of Saint Martin. Witnessed by Lord Jocelyn, bishop [of Glasgow]; Simon archdeacon; Herbert deacon; Gillenem Accoueltan; Gilledouengi his brother; Gillecrist mac Makin; Murdac mac Gillemartin; Gilleasald mac Gilleandres; Gillemernach his brother.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 24. no. 31]


[Comment] Roger de Skelbrooke appears to have been a vassal of Gilbert son of Fergus, whom he calls ‘my lord’ in this charter. After the treaty of 1186, Roger De Skelbrooke became a vassal of ‘Duncan son of Gilbert’ and built a ring work castle at Greenan near Ayr probably before 1189.  This charter was confirmed by Earl Duncan of Carrick sometime between 1193 and 1195. Drumeceisuiene’ probably now Old Lagg, and ‘Alesburc’ and ‘Auchnephur’ are Kyleston.


[6] Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus


1193-1195: Charter of Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus, earl of Carrick, by which he has given and granted and with this present charter confirmed to God and the church of St Marie of Melrose and the monks there serving God, the whole donation which he and Roger de Skelbrooke, his knight, granted and gave, namely the whole land of ‘Drumentheisuiene’, ‘Alebro’, and ‘Althefur’, by the same bounds as in Roger’s charter, with all easements of that land, save the service of the king from the earl and Roger. His witnesses: Jocelyn, bishop of Glasgow; Earl Duncan; Malcolm his son and heir; Earl Gilbert [of Strathern]; W. Alan, the King’s steward; William de Morville, the King’s constable; Gillecrist Mecachin; Ewen (sic. Ewine) Macalewin; John son of William; Recher Mecmaccharil; Edgar Macmurchan, my chamberlain; Gillebride Macmehin Achostduf and Ewen (sic. Ean) his brother.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 25. no. 32]


[Comment] William de Morville, the king’s constable, died in 1196. He succeeded his father Richard de Moreville (d. 1189) as constableship of Scotland in 1189-90. He held land in Galloway, where Gillecrist Mecachin appears to have been a native baron.  Mecachin is a corrupted form of McGachen, a lineage name attached in the kindred of Askeloc.  The MacCharil now McKerrells are believed to descend from the Ua Cairill, the chiefs of the Dal Fiatach (in modern County Down) in Ulster. In 1095, a great battle was found at Ard-achadh, by the Dalraida, over the Ulidians, wherein Lochlainn Ua Cairill, royal heir or Ulidia, was slain, and Gilla-Comghaill Ua Cairill, and a great host along with them.


[7] Roger de Skelbrooke


1193-1195: Charter by Roger of Skelbrooke by which he has given and granted and with this present charter confirmed to God and the church of St Marie of Melrose and the monks there serving God, for the salvation and soul of ‘my lord’, Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus, and for the souls of all his ancestors and successors, and for the salvation of himself and all his relatives and heirs, in free, pure and perpetual alms, his fishery in mouth of the River of Don above ‘Harenam’, one saltpan and one pan, wherever they may wish in his whole land of Greenan, and the timber of his nearby wood. Additionally, he granted to them one toft to be dwelled in, another toft below his castle of Greenan, a parcel of arable land and sufficient pasture for six oxen and ten cows. He granted and gave all this to the monks, free, quit and unbound from all terrestrial service, custom and secular exaction. His witnesses: Lord Jocelyn, bishop of Glasgow; Simon archibishop; my lord Duncan and Walter Corbet.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 27. no. 34]


[Comment] Dated to the death of Simon, archdeacon of Glasgow in 1196.


[8] Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus


1193-1196: Charter by Duncan son of Gilbert son of Fergus by whch he has granted and has confirmed to God by this his charter the donation of Roger of Skelbrooke, his knight, which he made to the church and abbey of St. Marie of Melrose, of a fishing on the sand on the River Doon, and of a saltworks and a pan with lands and tofts and all manner of easements, which Roger conferred on them in the territory of Greenan.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 28. no. 35]


[9] Sheriff and bailies of Carrick


1193-95: Brieve by King William I to his sheriffs and bailies of Galloway, Carrick and Lennox informing that he has heard the charters of King David I and King Malcolm IV concerning the liberties granted to the bishops of Glasgow in dues and teinds belonging to them throughout the diocese of Glasgow; namely, the bishops’ sergeants ought to receive teinds and due granted by the king’s predecessors just as the king’s sergeants receive royal dues for the king’s use. He commands them to allow the episcopal officers to receive these dues without obstruction. At Stirling and witnessed by Robert de Quincy; Philip de Valognes, chamberlain; Alexander, sheriff of Stirling; Willaim de Munfort; William Cumin; William Giffard.

[Barrow, G.W.S.: The Acts of William, Kings of Scots 1153-1165, also known as Regesta Regum Scottorum Vol. II (Edinbugh), p. 369, no. 374]


[Comment] Dated is after Philip de Valognes had succeeded Walter de Berkeley as chamberlain c.1193 and by Robert de Quincy who died in 1197. Roger was probably in England by 1196.


[10] Roger de Skelbrooke


1194-1196: Charter by Jocelyn, bishop of Glasgow by which he confirms with the consent of Roger de Skelbrooke and on his petition, to North Berwick Nunnery, the church of Kirkbride de Larges with half a ploughgate and 1 saltpan, and 2 acres of land at Crostum, with their teinds, oblations and all their rights, in free and perpetual alms. They can use the income as they want, except for the bishop's ones. Witnessed by Radulf, abbot of Melrose; Simon, archdeacon of the bishop; Herbert, deacon of Glasgow; Christian [sic. Cristin], deacon of Carrick; Helya [Elias?], William, canons of Glasgow; Richard, clerk of Dundovenald; John, Walter, Gervase, clerks of the bishop; Alexander of Kunigh, chaplain.

[Carte Monialium de Northberwic (1847), p. 4, no. 2]


[Comment] Dated by Radulf who became abbot of Melrose in 1194 and Simon archdeacon died in 1196. Christian appears to have been deacon of Carrick before Macrath.


[11] Henry son of Thurston


1198-1200: Charter by Henry son of Thurston son of Leving and Mary, his wife, daughter and heir of Roger of Skelbrooke, by which they granted and by their charter confirmed to God and the church of St Marie of Melrose and the monks there serving God, the donation which Roger made to the monks, namely of the land of ‘Drumeteisuiene’, ‘Alesbiri’ and ‘Auchnephur’, by the bounds in the charter of Roger, save half a mark each year from the land of ‘Auchnephur’ for recognition.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 26. no. 33]


[Comment] Henry’s father was ‘Thurston son of Leving’ is attested to in other documents.


1147-1178: Charter by Thurstan son of Levig, who grants to Holyrood Abbey the church of Leviggestun with half ploughgate of land, 1 toft, and all its rights and appurtenances, as his father did, in free and perpetual alms. Witnessed by Geoffrey, abbot of Dunfermline; Anfrid [Amfrid] de Newbattle; Walter, monk of Holyrood Abbey; Geoffrey of Lessew; Peter, chaplain of Louw; Walter, chaplain of the earl; Simon de "Ramesie"; Roger, dean; David, son of Geoffrey; Martin, clerk; Walter, steward of Reginald de Rosburg; William de Aldri.

[Liber Cartarum Sancte Crucis (1840), p. 15, no. 17]


Note: ‘Leving’ gave his name to Livingstone in West Lothian.


[12] Roderic MacGillescop


1198-1200: Charter by Roderic MacGillescop and Christina, his spouse, daughter of Roger of Skelbrooke, by which they granted and by this their charter confirmed to God and the church and abbey of St. Marie of Melrose, in free, pure and perpetual alms, the donation which Roger of Skelbrooke made to the monks of the fishery of Don above ‘Harenam’, one saltpan with the lands, tofts and all the easements which are contained in the charter of Roger, just as the charter of Roger testifies. Additionally, they granted the whole land of ‘Drumteisuiene’, ‘Alesburc’ and ‘Auchenephur’ as the charter of Roger and the confirmation of their lord, Duncan testifies. Witnessed by William, sheriff of the new Castle of Ayr, Walter, the king’s clerk, John the clerk, John brother of Udard, Gillebert Mac Kenedi, Ewen Mac Alewi, Gillenem Maccolm, and signed at the new castle under the seal of Sir Duncan.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 28. no. 36]


[Comment] The new castle of Ayr was built in 1197 and William is first name sheriff of Ayr. In ‘The Sheriffs of Scotland: An Interim List to c.1306’ by Norman H. Reid and G.W.S. Barrow, William, sheriff of Ayr is dated to c.1200. The new castle was located in the King’s Kyle in the newly created sheriffdom of Ayr, which covered the whole of Cunningham, Kyle and Carrick, but Renfrew. This charter contains the first contemporary reference to a Kennedy. He might well be the son of Henry Kennedy, probably known as Henry MacKennedy, killed in 1185.


[13] Duncan son of Gilbert


1198-1202: Charter by Duncan, son of Gilbert of Carrick by which he has given, and granted, and by this his present charter has confirmed to God and the church of St. Marie and monks of Melrose, two saltworks in a suitable place within the feu of Turnberry, and the 8 acres of arable land near the saltworks most useful to them, and pasture for all the animals of the saltworks, in pure and perpetual alms, free and quit from all custom and secular exaction, because their wood that they used to have at Greenan for a saltworks was utterly burnt and destroyed.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 29. no. 37]


[Comment] Turnberry Castle was the seat of Duncan son of Gilbert, and might have been the seat of his father Gilbert in his time. Turnberry is located in the parish of Kirkoswald, where the old church was dedicated to St. Oswald, a Northumbrian saint. There are no witnesses mentioned in this charter.


[14] Edgar son of Dovenald


1202-1206: [Headed] Charter by Thomas de Colville de Keres

[Translation] Let all present and to come know that I Thomas Colville known as a Scot have given granted and by this present charter of mine confirmed for the well-being of the soul of me and all my predecessors to God and the Blessed Mary and the abbey of Vaudey and the monks serving God there a fourth part of Almelidun which is called Keresban (Carsphairn) namely whatever I had between Polleneshan and Pollenscunt up to the water of Doon, so that they have and hold it freely and quietly, rendering there from annually to me and my heirs or any assignee six merks at the feast of St. Martin and three merks at Pentecost. And I and my heirs will warrant all the said land at the need of the foresaid monks in all points and against all me forever.  And if it happens that the lord King of Scotland wishes to relax and remit this said ferm to the foresaid monks for the well-being of the soul of himself and his predecessors I and my heirs willingly concede that so that we exact nothing ever of the said ferm from the said monks.  Witnessed by William, abbot of Melrose; Alan son of Roland de Galloway; Fergus son of Uchtred; Edgar son of Dovenald; Duncan son of Gilbert, earl of Carrick; Gillescop Maclhacain; Gilleduenan son of Duuegal; Gillecrist son of Kenedi; Ewen [sic. Iwan] son of Alewain; Gillenef Okeueltal; Gilleroth son of Gillemartin; Makeg son of Kyin; Gillesakeneshi son of Gillin.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 172. no. 192]


[Comment] In the Liber Sancte Marie de Melros, this charter has been wrongly placed under the reign of Alexander II, king of Scots. It should have been placed under the reign of William I.  It has been dated to abbacy of William, abbot of Melrose between 1202 and 1206. Duncan is said to have been created earl of Carrick by Alexander II about 1225 following further confirmation of his resignation of all claim to the lordship of Galloway. However, this charter indicates he may have been created earl of Carrick in the latter part of King William’s reign.


[15] Macrath, deacon of Carrick


1202-1207: Confirmatio capituli Glasguensis, de ecclesiis subscriptis.

OMNIBUS sancte ecclesie filiis Herbertus decanus et capitulum Glasgnensis ecclesie salutem in Domino. Sciatis nos intuitu divine caritatis concessisse et hac carta nostra confirmasse Priori et monachis de Passelet ibidem Deo servientibus, libertatem a domino nostro Florentio Glasguensi electo eis, de ecclesia de Kathkert, ecclesia de Ruthglen, ecclesia de Cormannoc, ecclesia de Kilberhan, ecclesia de Mernes, et ecclesia de Polloc, concessam et carta sua confirmatam; scilicet ut perpetualiter teneant et possideant omnes illas prenominatas ecclesias suas in suos usus proprios et in domus sue sustentationem. Ad autoritatem vero hujus nostre confirmationis confirmandam et corroborandam, dominus Robertus archidiaconus Glasguensis, dominus Johannes de Hunddun officials, huic scripto sigilla sua apponi fecerunt. Hiis testibus, Nigello abbate de Kilwinyn, Macraht decano de Carric, Wilelmo decano de Cunigham, Alexandro capellano de Cunigham, Alano capellano Archidiaconi, Idello capellano dicti Offieialis, Philippo de Perthec, Mauricio clerico domini Electi, Henrico de Cormannoc, Waltero, Murthac, Michaele clerico domini Herberti decani, Wilelmo et Georgio filiis Meidus’, et pluribus aliis.

[Registrum Monasterii De Passelet (1832), p. 110]


[16] Earl Duncan of Carrick


1204-1228: Transcript by John clerk of Glasgow, notary public, in presence of the witnesses, of an act brought by Thomas de Tynninghame, vicar of the church of Kilconquhar and procurator of North Berwick Nunnery, granting the church of Kirkbride in Carrick to North Berwick, and sealed by Duncan son of Gilbert. It was a charter by Duncan son of Gilbert of Carrick, witnessed by Lord Malcolm, earl of Fife, Duncan and David, his brothers; Andrew, vicar of Cunningham; Ness de Ramsey; Masters Peter and William, his sons; Master James of North Berwick; Master Richard of South Berwick; Winfrid, his brother; Alexander, chaplain. Transcript by the notary public made at St Andrews, 1418, indiction 11, last day of June, 23rd year of pope Benedict XIII [June 30, 1418].

[Carte Monialium de Northberwic (1847), p. 30, no. 28]


[17] Earl Duncan of Carrick


1214-1219: [Headed] Charter by Thomas de Colville de Keres

[Extract] Let all present and to come know that I Thomas de Colvill have given granted and by this present charter of mine confirmed to the church of St. Mary of Vaudey for the well-being of the soul of me and the souls of David, Malcolm and William kings of Scot and all my predecessors a fourth part of Almelidun (Dalmellington), which is called Keresban (Carsphairn) namely whatever I had between Pollenshan and Pollenescunt up to the water of Don, so that they have and hold it freely and quietly, rending there from annually to me and my heirs or any assignee five  merks of silver at two terms for all service custom and payment.  Witnessed by Lord Alan de Gallewei (Galloway); Earl Patrick; Walter son of Alan [the King’s steward]; Robert de Brus; Duncan de Carrick; Edgar son of Douenald; Fergus de Glencarn; Gillauenan son of Dunegal; Reginald de Crauford; Gillemor Magdunegal and many others.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 173. no. 193]


[Comment] This charter of confirmation must be dated between the death of William I, king of Scots, who died in December 4, 1214, and death of Thomas de Colville in 1219.  Alan de Galloway d.1234, Walter son of Alan (High Steward of Scotland) d.1246, Earl Patrick of Dunbar d.1248, Earl Duncan of Carrick d.1250, Reginald de Crawford, sheriff of Ayr, d. 1227.  Thomas de Colville also held the baronies of Oxnam and Heton in Roxburghshire, and Ochiltee in Ayrshire. ‘Gillauenan son of Duuegal’ is the same man called ‘Gilleduenan son of Duuegal’.


[18] Confirmation by King Alexander II of Scotland


October 2, 1219: Charter by King Alexander II confirming to Melrose Abbey all that land of 'Drumteihsiuene', 'Alesburc' and 'Auchnephur', which Roger of Skelbrooke gave them, as the charter of Roger and confirmation of Duncan, son of Gilbert [of Carrick] bear witness. At Edinburgh, 2nd day of October (1219).

[Simpson, G.G.: Regesta Regum Scottorum: Handlist of the Acts of Alexander III, the Guardians, and John 1249-96 (Edinburgh, 1960), Vol. III, no. 31]


[19] Duncan of Carrick


1219-1223: Charter by William de Colville of Keresban

[Extract] Confirmation by William de Colville son of Thomas de Colville of his father’s grant to abbey of Vaudey and the monks serving God there a fourth part of Almelidun which is called Keresban (Carsphairn) namely whatever they had between Polleneshan and Pollenscunt up to the water of Doon, so that they have and hold it freely and quietly, rendering there from annually to me and my heirs or any assignee six merks at the feast of St. Martin and three merks at Pentecost.  Witnessed by Lord Duncan de Carrick; Reginald de Crawford; Fergus de Glencarn; Robert de Biggar; Hugh son of Reginald de Crauford; Edward; Donald mac Edi; Gillecrist mac Haued’.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 174. no. 194]


[Comment] Dated between the death of his father and transfer of Keresban to the abbey of Melrose by the monks of Vaudey in 1223.  Fergus de Glencairn was the son of Edgar son of Dovenald, lord of Nithsdale.


[20] Duncan of Carrick


June 15, 1220: Notificiation by King Alexander II makes known that he undertakes to marry Joan, eldest sister of Sir Henry, king of England, on 29 September 1220 or earlier if Henry can give her to him; and, if not, he swears that he will marry Isabel, younger sister of King Henry, within fifteen days of 29 September (1220), and that meanwhile he will neither take nor negotiate for another wife. The bishops of St Andrews and Glasgow and William del Bois, the king’s chancellor, have promised truthfully to labour in good faith to ensure that these undertaking are fulfilled, and have given their charter to this effect. The earl of Buchan, Alan of Galloway, constable, and other barons of the king, that is, Philip de Mowbray, Walter Olifard, Duncan of Carrick, Henry de Balliol, Thomas Durward, John of Maxwell, David Marshal, Walter Comyn, Ranulf of Bunkle and Hervey, the marischal, have sworn to observe what the bishops have promised, and have given their charter accordingly. At Eboracum (York), 15th day of June, regnal year 6.

[Simpson, G.G.: Regesta Regum Scottorum: Handlist of the Acts of Alexander III, the Guardians, and John 1249-96 (Edinburgh, 1960), Vol. III, no. 54]


[21] Earl Duncan of Carrick


c.1225: Charter by Alan son of Roland, constable of Scotland, by which he granted, given, and confirmed by his present charter, to Hugh of Crawford, for his homage and service, his land of Munnoch (in Dalry, Ayr), by stated bounds, in pannages and assarts, and in all other easements and liberties, except stags, hinds, roe-deer, and young hawks, for an annual render of one unmewed sparrowhawk, on the feast of the Assumption of the BVM, for all services, customs and demands.Witnessed by Lord Walter son of Alan; Lord Enguerrand de Balliol, Lord Duncan of Carrick, William de Brus, Andrew de Loudon, Robert de Ros, ‘Alexander de neuh’, Hugh de Ardrossan, Adm de hormishoc, Richard, chaplain, Simon, clerk and ‘Radulf de clift’

[Stringer, Keith, J.: ‘Periphery and Core: Alan of Galloway’ in Medieval Scoltand: Crown, Lordhip and Community (1993), Appendix (A), p. 106-108, no. 4]


[22] T. deacon of Carrick


July 21, 1225: Charter by Lord Duncan of Carrick, on Monday before the feast of St Mary Magdalene, 1225, in chapter at Ayr, in the presence of Walter [of St. Albans], bishop of Glasgow, and many others solemnly swearing to him, has granted in his own fidelity and in the faith owed to God and the church, and has firmly promised that all his teinds and ecclesiastical rights he will pay to the God and the church in full for the whole time of his life, namely, of grain, of hay, and multure, of wool and flax, of cheese and butter, of calves and lambs, of piglets and chickens and ‘capreolis’, and all other things which the Christian law instructs should be given as teinds and ecclesiastical rights, and should be paid in the diocese of Glasgow. He has also granted that the clerks of Carrick will not be weighed down with taxes and exactions, in perpetuity. Witnessed by John, abbot of Kilwinning; Odene, abbot of Dercungal; T. deacon of Carrick; Humphrey former deacon of Cunningham; Gilbert de Cathcart; A. & J. chaplains of bishop; Master William de Kilkenny, Robert de Edenhall, William de Carlisle, Godard, clerks of Alan, lord of Galloway; Robert de Bigger; Jordan Loccard; Robert the chanceller; Walter the clerk; Elias Wallace, knight of Earl Duncan of Carrick; Walter Champanais, Master Hugh de Carrick; and many others.

[Registrum Episcopatus Glasguensis (1843), p. 117, no. 139]


[Comment] Kilconquhar is in Fife. John was abbot of Kilwinning 1221-1230; Odo Ydone was bishop-elect of Whithorn 1235-1241. Master William de Kilkenny was bishop of Ely and died in 1256. Ness de Ramsey was a baron in Fife.


[23] Papal Confimation by Pope Honorius III


January 23, 1226: Papal Confirmation by Pope Honorius III writes to William, prior of Paisley Abbey, taking the monastery into his protection; the possessions and goods which they possess canonically and other privileges and goods which they have or may acquire by papal permission, by the liberality of kings or the gifts of the faithful, may remain with the prior and his successors, including from the gift of Nobleman Duncan, earl of Carrick, the land of Crossraguel, ‘Suthblan’, and one ploughgate in Ireland at ‘Dumals’ which is called ‘Tibiror’.

[Registrum Monasterii De Passelet (1832), p. 410-4]


[24] Sir John, knight, son of Earl Duncan of Carrick


1233-1240: Charter by Duncan, earl of Carrick, who grants to North Berwick Nunnery a yearly rent of 3 marks of silver, to perceive on the land of Barrebeth, half at the Pentecost, and the other half on St Martin's day. Witnessed by Sir John, knight, son of the Earl; Master Hugh, clerk; Alan the deacon; Murthac the steward (sic. Senescallo) and several others.

[Carte Monialium de Northberwic (1847), p. 30, no. 1]



[Comment] It has been suggested this grant was made as early as 1200. This can not be the case as his son Sir John de Carrick was created a knight by Alexander II of Scotland.


[25] Gilleconnel Manthac, brother of Earl Duncan


November 12, 1233: It is the intent of the abbot and convent of Paisley to prove that all that land of ‘Monachkennaran’ over the River Clyde is unjustly alienated to Gilbert son of Samuel, because the right ought to belong to the church of Kilpatrick, whence Gilbert sought to move it, and to revoke that land from the lawful right and property of the church of Kilpatrick. Witnesses were first produced by the abbot and convent against Gilbert on the Monday before the feast of St Matthew in the parish church of Irvine, in the year 1233. These jurors testified: Alexander son of Hugh, Thomas Gaskell, Dubgall son of Earl [Alwin II of Lennox]. Witnesses were secondly produced by the abbot and convent on the Saturday after the feast of St Martin, in the parish church of Ayr, in the same year. These jurors testified: Malcolm Beg, Anecol, Gillon, Gilbethoc, Fergus son of Cuningham, Hilary, Nehemiah, Ressin, Gillemuire, “Rotheric Beg” of Carrick (brother of Malcolm Beg), Rathel and “Gillekonel Manthac”, brother of the earl of Carrick. At the parish church of Yrewin (Irvine), Saturday after the feast of St Martin, 1233.

[Registrum Monasterii De Passelet (1832), p. 166-8]


[Comment] Ruadri is Gealic for Rotheric meaning red or great king (pronounced rua-ree). It can be translated Roderick, Rory and Roger. ‘Beg’ means ‘Mor’ (Gaelic) as in big, which is usually applied to the father where the son is ‘Ruadri og’ meaning young. Gilleconnel’s nickname Manthac means the Stammerer.


[26] Lawrence, deacon of Carrick


1233-1235: Laurence, dean of Carrick, Richard, dean of Cunningham, and Alan, master of the schools of Ayr indicate to William, bishop of Glasgow, that they were made papal judges-delegate in a certain case called between the abbot and convent of Paisley and Gilbert, son of Samuel, of Renfrew, concerning that land of ‘Monachkennaran’, which Gilbert held and still holds. They have approved the intention of the abbot and convent and adjudged possession to them, by the counsel of prudent men and skilled judges, and they condemn Gilbert to pay the expenses, that is £30 which was pledged from the monks’ part and which was valued and moderated by the judges. The judges thus entrust the bishop to execute their settlement against Gilbert by ecclesiastical censure.

[Registrum Monasterii De Passelet (1832), p. 168]


[27] Earl Duncan of Carrick


1236: Letter by Duncan, earl of Carrick, to W(illiam), bishop of Glasgow, asking him to stand surety for him against the abbot and convent of Melrose in respect of the matters contained in his charter, and to put his seal, together with his own, to that charter, and to ask the king to confirm what is contained in that same charter.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 169. no. 188]


[28] Earl Duncan of Carrick


1236: Charter by Duncan, earl of Carrick, gives notice that since the monks of Melrose Abbey are bound to him for an annual payment of three marks, i.e., two for the land of Beoch, and one for the land of ‘Auchnefure’, as contained in their charters, he has relaxed and quitclaimed in perpetuity the three marks in return for 40 marks sterling, which the monks have paid him all at once in his great necessity, that is, deposited in return for his land in liberty; he therefore puts forward William, bishop of Glasgow, as surety, allowing that if, at any time, he or his heirs or successors should attempt anything against this or against the alms made by him to Melrose Abbey as contained in his charters, the bishop could compel him or his heirs under threat of ecclesiastical censure. Witnessed by Sir Walter son of Alan, steward of Scotland; Radulf de leuinti, clerk; Alan, my knight; Alan my son, parson of Kirchemanen and Straiton; Master Hugh, my clerk, and many others.

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 170. no. 189]


[29] Confirmation of King Alexander II of Scotland


August 25, 1236: Charter by King Alexander II whereby he grants and confirms the gift which Duncan, the son of Gilbert, Earl of Carrick, made to God and St. James and St. Mirin of Paisley, and the monks there serving God, and to serve for ever, of the churches of Turnberry, Straiten, and Dalmakeran, with all their right pertinents ; and also of the five penny land of Crosragmol and of Sutblan, by their right marches; to be held by the said monks in free, pure, and perpetual alms, as freely as the charter of the said Duncan bears ; reserving the king's service. Witnesses by Alexander bishop of Moray, Philip of Mubray, Eoger Avenel, David the Marischal, William of Lyndesay, William of Mar', Adam of Logan. At Edinburgh, 25th day of August, regnal year 22.

[Charters of the Abbey of Crosraguel Vol. I in ‘The Ayrshire and Galloway Archaeological Association’ (1886), p. 2, no. 2]


[Comment] Suthblane is Blanefield.


[30] Earl Duncan of Carrick


c.1240: Charter by Duncan, earl of Carrick by which he has given and granted, and by this his charter confirmed the advowson of the church of Maybole to North Berwick Priory with lands, chapels, teinds, oblations and all rights justly pertaining to it, in pure and perpetual alms. Witnessed by Hector and Alan, knights, and Gillescop, steward [sic. Seneschal] of Carrick; John, deacon; Master Hugh; Somerled [sic. Sumerleht]; Nigel Macgilwyn, David Sibbald; Master Alan; Alexander and Alan, sons of the earl, and several others.

[Carte Monialium de Northberwic (1847), p. 13, no. 13]


[Comment] In Scotland Hector is often anglicised from Eachann.


[31] Earl Duncan of Carrick


c.1240: Charter by Duncan, earl of Carrick, who grants to North Berwick Priory the church of Maybothel with its lands, teinds, and oblations, all its rights and appurtenances, in pure and perpetual alms.  Witnessed by Hector and Alan, knights, Gillescop, steward [sic. Seneschal] of Carrick; John, deacon; Master Hugh; Somerled [sic. Sumerleht]; Nigel Macgilwyn, David Sibbald; Master Alan; Alexander and Alan, sons of the earl, and several others.

[Carte Monialium de Northberwic (1847), p. 13, no. 14]

 

[32] Quite Claim of Gillescop MacKenedi steward of Carrick


c.1240: [Translation] To all children of the Holy mother church and the faithful present and to come Gillescopewyn Mackenedi steward of Karric gives greeting. Know that since there was a controversy between me and the monks of Melrose concerning a certain particle of land which is contiguous to that road called Euauchouegas on the east part, I for the well-being of my soul have given granted and quitclaimed the foresaid land to God and the Blessed Mary of Melrose and the monks serving God there and I have renounced all right which had or could have in the said land so that the foresaid monks should hold and possess the foresaid land peacefully and quietly for me and my heirs in perpetuity I have handed to the said monks the present writing confirmed by my seal. His witnesses [not named].

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melros (1837), p. 171, no. 190]


[33] Nicholas son of Duncan of Carrick

 

1240-1250: Charter by Nicholas son of Duncan of Carrick by which he has granted, and by this present charter confirmed to the church of St Cuthbert at Maybole in Carrick to North Berwick Priory in pure and perpetual alms, with lands, chapels, teinds and oblations, all other rights pertaining to it, as the charter of Earl Duncan his father bears witness. Witnessed by Malcolm, earl of Fife, Duncan, ‘my father’, Hector, ‘my knight’, David Sibbald, Murthuc macKenede, Hugh Hoc, William of St. Andrews and many others.

[Carte Monialium de Northberwic (1847) p. 14, no. 15]


[Comment] Mr. Andrew B. W. MacEwen, genealogist of Stockton Springs, Maine, has shown Nicholas was the eldest son and heir of Duncan of Carrick and married a daughter of Niall Raudh, brother and briefly successor of Aed II O’Neill, king of the Cenel Eoghan. Nicholas died in the lifetime of his father and left a son Neil who succeeded his grandfather Earl Duncan in 1250.


[34] Quitclaim of Walter Champanais of Carrick


1243: Charter by Walter Champanais

[Extract] Quitclaim by Walter Champanais of Carrick of the land which lies next to his land of Dunduff, in which has claimed right. It is to be held by the same divisions which his lord Duncan earl of Carrick perambulated for friar Matthew of Neutun then cellarer of Melrose and his colleagues in the presence of Gillescop MacKenedi then steward of Karrig, Rotheric (sic. Ruadri) Quapath, Alexander Dunynian and others.  20 shillings Stirling is to be paid by the monks through the hand of Richard de Bige then monk of Mauchline.  Witnessed by ‘my lord Duncan earl of Carrick, Sir David de Lindsay, Justice of Lothian, Alexander, steward of Scotia, Robert de Curry, Nigel Mackegilduff and many others.  

[Liber Sancte Marie de Melrose (1837), p. 171, no. 191]


[Comment] Matthew the chancellor was elected abbot on April 13, 1246. Sir David de Lindsay was justiciar of Lothian between 1242 and1249 (51?) and Alexander was the king’s steward of Scotia in 1241 and 1242.


[35] Sir Reginald son of Udard


1240-1245: Philip, abbot of Jedburgh, and John, abbot of Dryburgh, have settled the case called before them by papal authority between the abbot and convent of Kelso and Daniel and Robert de Dowan and their wives concerning the land of Dowan (Devon Burn, in Lesmahagow parish), which the abbot and convent claimed from the said Daniel and Robert and their wives, as being illicitly alienated from his monastery to his right and as being revoked of ownership. The said D[aniel] and R[obert], for good peace, have granted to the abbot and monks a certain sum of money and conceded to the same a site for a mill above Kerlyngholm just as the Devon Burn descends and falls into the Nethan, with free water ways through the land of Dowan towards the mill and for the building of a dam. They granted also to Kelso from the villa of the mill, and to all those coming to that mill, common pasture of Delues from the mill in the direction of the east towards Bra, opposite the mill; and from the same Bra, descending up to the Nethan and from Nethan ascending up to the mill through the Devon Burn. The men of the villa of the mill may not graze [their animals] there unless during half the year of winter, but everyone coming to the mill may graze there all year without impediment and contradiction. Within the said marches of Delues, never shall it become pasture or arable land, but shall always be situated in common pasture; D. and R. and their wives conceded to the abbot and monks the common peat-moor which goes near Thorebrechs up to the house which belongs to the said Robert of Dowan in the same land, during the life of Constantine, with free entry and exit to dig and carry their peat, together with a sufficient and competent place which they shall dig for their peat near the place being drained for digging, saving wheat. Witnessed by Sir William de Douglas; Sir Reginald son of Udard; Sir Walter Fleming (sic. Flandrensis); Sir J. vicar of Peebles; Duncan, parson of Douglas; W. vicar of Dunsyer; W. Maitland; Richard de Boulden; J. de Mortimer; Alexander, the marischal, serviens of Kelso and many others.

[Liber S. Marie de Calchou 1113-1567 (1846), Vol I, no. 139]


[Comment] The bishop of Glasgow was William de Bonningham 1232-1258. Philip, abbott of Jedburgh 1239-1249; John, abbot of Dryburgh was elected between 1240-45 and was dead before 1255.


[36] Sir Reginald son of Udard


1235-1264: Charter by Hugh of Crawford son of Hugh of Crawford by which he has given, granted and by this his present charter established to Reginald his flesh-brother for his homage and service, all of that piece of land of Kerse, which he holds from Sir Roger, earl of Winchester and his heirs, in feu and heritage, by its right bounds, with all its just pertinents, for an annual render of a pair of gilt spurs on Easter for all services. Witnessed by Sir Godfrey de Ros; Sir Reginald son of Udard; Stephen Fleming, John de Crawford, Jordan Lochart; Reginald mor; Uctred de Kilmarnoc; Simon the wine-merchant; Malcolm son of Edward; Donald son of Kedi; Adam, the bishop’s brother, Adam and Adam, the clerks.

[Mount Stuart, Marquess of Bute, Loudoun charters, no. 5]


[Comment] Dated between the succession of Roger de Quincy to earldom of Winchester in Feburary 1235 and death of Sir Roger de Quincy in 1264. Hugh de Crawford was the brother of Reginald de Crawford, sheriff of Ayr (1219-1227); Reginald is Latin for Regnall.


[37] Earl Duncan of Carrick


July 18, 1244: Letter of Settlement by William, bishop of Glasgow, who settles the dispute between Duncan, earl of Carrick, and Paisley Abbey concerning the religious order of Paisley founded in Carrick, at Crossraguel, and concerning goods which the said abbot and convent possessed from the collation of the said earl. With the consent of the chapter of Glasgow he has ordained the following: the religious house constructed on the said land may be free to elect an abbot, and shall be exempt from everything. They shall be conformed to the order observed by the house of Paisley and shall provide visitation to the abbot of Paisley. Also, any goods which Paisley Abbey possesses for their own uses in Carrick shall fall to them in perpetuity, saving 10 marks to the house of Paisley at Pentecost. Held at Glasgow.

[Registrum Monasterii De Passelet (1832), p. 424-5]


[38] John de Carrick son of Earl Duncan


October 30, 1244: Charter by King Alexander II by which he granted and confirmed to Glasgow Cathedral and Bishop William [de Bondington] the donation made by John of Carrick, son of Earl Duncan of Carrick, of one pennyland called 'Hachinclohyn', equivalent of four marks of land, in feu of Straiton, with advowson of church of Straiton. At Jedburgh.

[Simpson, G.G.: Regesta Regum Scottorum: Handlist of the Acts of Alexander III, the Guardians, and John 1249-96 (Edinburgh, 1960), Vol. III, no. 270]


[39] Nigel or Neil, earl of Carrick


1250-1256: Charter by Niall, earl of Carrick, and Isabella, countess of Carrick by which they granted and gave to Saddell Abbey two pennylands, namely, Kildonan and Creisbog, within the earldom of Carrick.

[Paul, James B.: Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotrum 1424-1513, Vol. II, no. 3170 (4)]


[30] Nigel or Neil, earl of Carrick


1250-1256: Nigellus, earl of Carrick, has granted for himself and his heirs, and has by this his present charter established in perpetuity, to Roland of Carrick and his heirs, that the same and his heirs should be the head of his whole kindred, whether in challenges or in other articles and negotiations pertaining to the ‘Kenkenolle’. Roland will have the office of baillie and the leadership of the earl’s men in the aforesaid land, under the earl and his heirs, in perpetuity, without any contradiction or revocation.

[Thomson, John M.: Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotrum 1306-1424, Vol. I, no.509]


[Comment] This charter is contained in an inspection by King Robert II dated 1 October 1, 1372. This charter was confirmed by Alexander III on January 20, 1276.


[41] Sir Hector of Carrick


March 18, 1259: Walter Cumin earl of Menteith, Alexander Cumyn earl of Buchan, Justiciar of Scotland, William earl of Mar, William earl of Ros, John Comyn, Justiciar of Galloway, Aime de Makeswel (Maxwell), Chamberlain of Scotland, Fresekin de Moravia (Moray), Hugh de Abirnithun, William de Mohaut (Mowat), William Cumyn, and Richard Cumyn, brothers of Sir John Cumyn, Hugh and Walter de Berkeley, brothers, Bernard de Mohaue, Reginald Cheyn, David Lochar,  John Dundemor, William de Erth, Ector de Karrik, and their friends and allies, make known that on the 18th March 1258, they made a bond of mutual alliance and friendship with Sir Lewelin son of Griffin, Prince of Wales, and David son of Gruffud, his brother uterine, and many others [names listed]. That without the consent of the Welsh prince and magnates, they will make neither peace nor truce henceforth with the King of England, or any magnates of his realm, or the realm of Scotland, who at the date of the instrument, are adverse and rebels to the Welshmen and the granters, unless they are all similarly bound with themselves. Followed by a number of other terms agreed with the princes and magnates of Wales on oaths in the hand of Alan de Yrewyn the Scottish granters’ envoy.

[Bain, Joseph: Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1108-1272, Vol. I, p. 421-422]


[42] Sir Roland of Carrick


July 21, 1260: Die mercurii proxima post festum sancte Margarete virginis anno domini m cc sexagesimo apud Are in presentia dominorum Willelmi de Dufglas.. . . et Alexandri Huuyeth facta fuit extenta duarum partium terre de Carnk quas dominus rex tenet in manu sua nomine custodie usque ad legitimam etatem recti heredis per sacramentum proborum et fidelium hominum patrie secundum mandatum regium videlicet per sacramentum domini Rolandi de Carric, Murthach mac Kenedy, Samuel mac Kenedy, Dunegal mac Gilendres, Sufne mac Ragnell, Macrath mac Nell, Henrici de Ros, Murthach filii Somerlech, Roberti de Castello, Andree taluatoris senescalli, Henrici mac Kenedy, et Gilmur ludicis, et omnes iurati predicti dixerunt in veritatem quod terra de Straton videlicet xiiij denariate terre valent annuatim Ixx sex marcas. Item terra de Drumfad et de Glenop scilicet decem denariate terre valent annuatim xl marcas. Item terra de Dalachoran, scilicet ii denariate terre, valent annuatim viii marcas. Item terra de Glenkenith scilicet ii denariate terre valent annuatim iii marcas et dimidiam. Item terra de Turnebyri in omnibus secundum quod hucusque extenta fuit sive dimissa xxxvii marcas xii solidos et ii denarios. Item warde de Bennan et de Cunray quantum pertinet ad dominum regem iiii marcas et dimidiam. Summa denariorum in omnibus viiixx marcas viii marcas xii solidos et [ii] denarios. Dicte terre numquam dimisse fuerunt pro maiori precio usque ad presens tempus. In cuius rei testimonium dicti domini W. de Dufglas et Alexander Huuyeth sigilla sua una cum sigillis eorum qui dicte extente \ faciende / per sacramentum eorum interfuerunt apponi huic scripto fecerunt. De predicto \ vero / pecunia et de escaetis predictarum terrarum oportebit expensas facere in castris de Carrik excepto servicio libere tenentium.

[Milne, Isabel A: An Extent of Carrick in 1260, in The Scottish Historical Review, Vol. 34, p.46]


[Translation] An extent was made in the presence of Sirs William of Douglas and Alexander Uvieth, of two pieces of the land of Carrick that the lord king holds in his hand, in the name of the wardship until a legitimate age of the rightful heir, by the oaths of responsible and faithful men of the country according to the royal mandate, namely by the oaths of Sir Roland of Carrick, Murethach mac Kennedy, Samuel mac Kennedy, Dungal mac Gillanders, Suibne (Sweeney) mac Ragnall, Macrath mac Niall, Henry de Ros, Murethach son of Somerled, Robert de Castello, Andrew the steward’s tailor, Henry mac Kennedy and Gillemuire the judex; and all the jurors said in truth that the land of Straiton, namely, 14 pennylands worth 76 marks annually; the land of Drumfad and of ‘Glenop’, namely, 10 pennylands worth 40 marks annually; the land of Dalquharran, two pennylands, worth 8 marks; the land of ‘Glenkenith’ (now Glengennet), namely, two pennylands worth 3 ½ marks annually; the land of Turnberry, in all things, according to the extent that was (?) or if demitted, 37 marks, 7s. 2d.; the ward of Bennane and ‘Cunray’ (now Cundry), as much as belongs to the lord king, 4 ½ marks; the total of all the pennies being 160 (8 X 20) marks, 8 marks 12s. 2d. The said land was never demitted at a greater price up to the present time. Sirs W[illiam] of Douglas and Alexander Uvieth have appended their seals. Of the aforesaid money and escheats, it will be necessary to make expenses in the castles of Carrick, except the service of free tenancy.


[Comment] In the same Review and see James Fergusson.


[43] Sir Roland of Carrick


September 22, 1260: Inquisition made at Gerwan (Girvan) in Karryk on the morrow of St Mathew, Apostle and Evangelist, in presence of Sir S[tephen] Fleming (Flandr’), bailiff of Karryk, by oath of these; viz., Sirs Rolland de Karryk, Alan de Carletun, Walter de Kinardely, knights, Henry Mackenedy, Murdach Mackenedy, Molcal’ de Duffglas, Dungal MacGilendres, Carbre Mackan, Alan de Denton, Alex­ander MacThorsteyn, Molcal’ Albenach (the Scot), and Murdach son of Sumerleth (Somerled), who say that they well knew and heard that a marriage was contracted between Hector, son of Sir Hector, and Samuel Mackan's daughter. And Sir Hector placed his son Hector in full seizin of the fivepenny land of Akensawelle, for a sum of money paid down to him by Samuel. And H[ector] his son was in seizing for a year and a half, and Samuel was custos thereof for same period.  It chanced that anger and discord arose between Hector and Samuel and on account thereof Sir Hector recognosced and took seizin of the land, not judicially but voluntarily, and so cultivated the same, and at length deceased.

[Bain, Joseph: Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland 1108-1272, Vol. I, p. 553, no. 2674]


[Comment] Sir Hector is the same Sir Hector, knight, of Earl Duncan listed in no. 26. Samuel Mackan appears to be a brother or close relation of Carbre Mackan.


[44] Papal Confimation of the late Earl Duncan’s grants to Paisley Abbey


1265: Pope Clement IV writes to the abbot and convent of Paisley, taking the monastery into his protection; all the possessions and goods which they have or may acquire by papal permission, by the liberality of kings or the gifts of the faithful, may remain with the abbot and his successors, including the place where the monastery is situated with its pertinent, including: the gift of the late Duncan, earl of Carrick, all the land of Crossraguel and ‘Sutheblan’.

[Registrum Monasterii De Passelet (1832), p. 308-12]


[45] Papal Confimation of the late Earl Duncan’s grants to Paisley Abbey


February 2, 1266: Papal conformation of Pope Clement IV writes to the bishop of Dunblane, the abbot of Dryburgh and Master Roger of Derby, precentor of Aberdeen, noting that the abbot and convent of Paisley have showed him in a petition that when the late Duncan, earl of Carrick, had given the right of patronage of the church of St Oswald of Turnberry and of certain other churches, and lands, possessions and other goods belonging to the same in the Glasgow diocese, in perpetual alms, the abbot and convent had constructed at the possessions a certain oratory, to be served by certain of their monks; afterwards the earl asserted that he himself had granted the right of patronage, lands, possessions and goods of those under condition that it might be constructed in the said possessions, to which church the land, possessions and goods had been assigned and concerning this, a dispute arose from the abbot and convent. At last, the parties submitted themselves to the ordination of the bishop of Glasgow, of good memory, and the abbot and convent renouncing the benefit of restitution, of canonical and civil law, by assistance and by letters obtained by the apostolic see; the said bishop, with the assent of the parties and the chapter of Glasgow, ordained that a monastery, called Crossraguel, might be constructed at the possessions from the monks of the monastery above, who will be able to elect the abbot through canonical election and that the said monastery, being constructed by the power and jurisdiction of the abbot and convent of Paisley, may be exempt in everything, except in the conformation and observation of the order and habit, and that the abbot of Paisley may visit the said monastery of Crossraguel once a year. It was ordained also that all goods, which the abbot and convent of Paisley had at any time in Carrick, they had ceded for the uses of the said monastery being constructed, and that the abbot and convent [of Crossraguel] would pay to the abbot and convent of Paisley for all these things a yearly rent of 10 marks; the said bishop and his successors had been able to restrict the parties to observe this ordination through ecclesiastical censure. The said abbot and convent of Paisley had beseeched the pope, so that this ordination does not injure the monastery of Paisley, to provide solicitude. He thus commands them, call together those who shall be summoned, if it shall be agreed that the monastery of Paisley has sustained injury from this ordination, restore what is just, hear the case, and within a year to terminate it, causing what is decreed to be observed firmly by ecclesiastical censure. Otherwise, they may remit the case to the apostolic see, at a fixed time, [and] the parties may represent themselves through themselves or suitable procurators. If the witnesses named shall have withdrawn out of favour, hatred or fear, they shall compel them by the same censure, without appeal, to provide testimony of the truth. Not hindering what is granted by the see that some cannot be [placed under] interdict, suspended or excommunicated by letters not making expressed mention of an indulgence of this sort. On the fixed day, they may intimate to the pope whatever they shall produce through their letters. If all of them cannot take part in carrying this out, let two of them do it.

[Registrum Monasterii De Passelet (1832), p. 422-4]


[46] Adam de Kilconquhar


February 20, 1267: Charter by Adam, lord of Kilconquhar, earl of Carrick. Despite the fact that he and his predecessors disturbed the advowson of North Berwick Nunnery on the church of Kilconquhar, saying that it belonged to them, the earl now confirms, after enquiry, the nuns' rights, and renounces all his rights on said church, granting them his appurtenances and rights in free, pure and perpetual alms. If his, his brother William or their heirs try to take the church back, they will pay to the Nunnery 1000 marks sterling and pay for all the damages and expenses of the trial. He submits himself to the jurisdiction of the bishops of St Andrews and Glasgow, and, if needed, to excommunication and interdict. At Kilconquhar. 10 Calends of March 1267.

[Carte Monialium de Northberwic (1847) p. 18, no. 19]


[47] Adam de Kilconquhar


14 April 14, 1271: Charter by Gamelin, bishop of St Andrews, who confirms the ratification made by lord Adam de Kilconquhar, earl of Carrick, about the grants of the church of Kilconquhar given to North Berwick Nunnery by the late lord Duncan, earl of Fife, and by others, whether the grants were made before or after the enfeoffment of this land to Adam's predecessors. The bishop also confirms the grant made by the earl of all his rights on said church, and his quit-claim. At Inchemurthac, 18 Calends of May 1271.

[Carte Monialium de Northberwic (1847) p. 22, no. 21]


[48] Gilbert son of the late Sir Roland de Carrick


October 11, 1285: Charter by Robert, bishop of Glasgow, and Robert Bruce, earl of Carrick, who settled a dispute between Gilbert, son of the late Sir Roland de Carrick, knight, and the prioress and convent of the nuns of the convent of North Berwick over the advowson on the church of Maybole and on the land called ‘le red hohc’. The bishop decided that the advowson and land belonged to the Nunnery but the nuns will have to pay 40 marks to Gilbert and his heir for the sake of concord. Gilbert will grant North Berwick a charter promising not to disturb them. Robert Bruce confirms these decisions.  

[Carte Monialium de Northberwic (1847) p. 23, no. 22]





Early Medieval Documents

Containing references to the Lands, Lords and People

Of Carrick in Ayrshire